When the heat is on

Hot, muggy weather like never before


COOL KIDS—Emma Glasgow, 2, of Sherman Oaks beats the heat at the Oak Canyon Community Park splash pad Sept. 3 in Oak Park. Temperatures have fallen and will stay in the mid-80s into next week. BOBBY CURTIS/Acorn Newspapers

COOL KIDS—Emma Glasgow, 2, of Sherman Oaks beats the heat at the Oak Canyon Community Park splash pad Sept. 3 in Oak Park. Temperatures have fallen and will stay in the mid-80s into next week. BOBBY CURTIS/Acorn Newspapers

The heat wave that baked southern California last week sent residents running for air conditioners and ducking indoors, especially during the afternoon hours when temperatures soared above 100 degrees on a daily basis.

Triple-digit, record temps blasted the normally cool Camarillo area, which hit 101 on Sept. 2. The previous high was 98 degrees in 1955, according the National Weather Service Oxnard office.

 

 

The heat wave that started on Aug. 28 lasted through the weekend, and temperatures above 105 were not uncommon from Calabasas to Simi Valley and all points in between.

The Ventura County sheriff’s air unit was called to Sandstone Peak in eastern Ventura County on Thurs., Aug. 31 to assist a hiker suffering from dehydration. Senior Deputy Ryan Poynter said his office responded to six heat-related cases last month.

“People will go out hiking but not bring enough water, so they run out quickly,” Poynter said.

Pets also felt the burn.

“Sometimes you’ll have people bring their dog, and they bring water for themselves but not the dog, and dogs overheat so fast they can have major issues,” Poynter said.

In July, two dogs died from overheating on the Sandstone trail. Officials with the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area urge owners to be cautious when taking their pets out in hot weather and to give them plenty of water and to take frequent breaks.

Parts of Ventura County avoided the excessive heat—Oxnard only reached the mid-90s.

The scorching temps created ideal fire conditions across much of the state—San Francisco hit a record 106 degrees on Sept. 1— and aggravated efforts to control the fires burning in the east San Fernando Valley.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti declared a local state of emergency Sept. 2 and the state for help in La Tuna Canyon burned 7,000 brought

Local parents expressed concern • for student athletes who were• still seen practicing on hot fields• in the heat of the afternoon. •

Oak Park High School football coach Casey Webb said he’s been• giving players more water breaks• during the heat wave, and that• the team did spend one practice session in a cool classroom rather than on the hot turf. •

“It’s been extraordinarily hot, but we didn’t have one kid complaining all week,” Webb said.

“We take a lot of caution, but we do have a job to do. We’ve got to be prepared but we’re never going to put the players in a position where something can happen to them,” the coach said.

District Superintendent Dan Stepenosky took time last week to visit classrooms, check on air conditioners and principals to make sure the weather wasn’t affecting lessons.

“It’s my expectation that during these massive heat waves we seek alternative activities for the kids,” Stepenosky said. “I don’t want us to do the regular old practice and tough it out.”

The heat finally broke last Saturday night when temperatures dipped into the 80s. Labor Day brought light rains to the area, a welcome relief from the pounding sun.