Emmy Award-winning editor cut numerous hit TV series

Edward Abroms dies at age 82

IN MEMORY—Emmy winner and Oscar nominee film editor and director Edward M. Abroms of Thousand Oaks receives an award. Courtesy photo

IN MEMORY—Emmy winner and Oscar nominee film editor and director Edward M. Abroms of Thousand Oaks receives an award. Courtesy photo

Emmy Award-winning film editor Edward Abroms died Feb. 13 of heart failure. He lived in Thousand Oaks with his wife of 60 years, Colleen.

His prolific resume over 30 years included editing such series as “Ironside,” “Murder She Wrote” and “Columbo.”

He won an Emmy for “My Sweet Charlie” in 1970 and for “Columbo” in 1972.

He has over 50 credits as a director for the series “Kojak,” “Police Story,” “CHiPs,” “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “Hawaii Five-O,” among many others.

He also worked as an editor on feature films including “The Sugarland Express” for director Steven Spielberg and “Blue Thunder,” for which he received an Oscar nomination in 1983.

Abroms was a long-time member of several industry organizations including the Directors Guild of America, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, Motion Picture Editors Guild and American Cinema Editors.

He served 30 years on the board of ACE, with the last 17 as the treasurer.

ACE honored Abroms with a Career Achievement Award in 2006.

Abroms is survived by his wife and his children Ed Abroms and his wife, Terra; Lynn Abroms and her partner, Scott Lerner; and Cindy Hammond and her husband, Danny, well as his grandchildren Brandon, James and Jordon and his wife, Jordann.

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