2012-04-26 / Front Page

Bump in the road for Old Agoura community

Private speed bump problem for cyclists
By Stephanie Bertholdo


ROUGH GOING—Without county maintenance, Old Agoura must take care of its own speed bumps. One bump remains in disrepair. 
WENDY PIERRO/Acorn Newspapers ROUGH GOING—Without county maintenance, Old Agoura must take care of its own speed bumps. One bump remains in disrepair. WENDY PIERRO/Acorn Newspapers Bicycle rider Vince Hull hit a speed bump on a private road in Old Agoura and went flying.

The April 6 accident left him unconscious until a passerby found him and called paramedics. The accident, which raises questions about the effectiveness of private road maintenance in the community, happened on a section of Chesebro Road near Driver Avenue.

Hull, 56, said he sustained a concussion, four broken ribs and a “fair amount of road rash.” He was taken by helicopter to UCLA Medical Center where he spent two days before being released.

Hull said there are three speed bumps on the road, and the one that he hit is particularly treacherous. The speed bump constructed and supposedly maintained by the homeowners is obscured by either dark shade or bright sunshine.


ROUGH GOING—Without county maintenance, Old Agoura must take care of its own speed bumps. One bump remains in disrepair. 
WENDY PIERRO/Acorn Newspapers ROUGH GOING—Without county maintenance, Old Agoura must take care of its own speed bumps. One bump remains in disrepair. WENDY PIERRO/Acorn Newspapers “I knew it was there,” Hull said. “I saw the two speed bumps and approached (with caution).”

But the third bump seemed to disappear in the shadows of a large tree, he said.

Wendy Doheney of Agoura Hills found Hull passed out on the road while jogging with a friend. She stayed with Hull while her friend summoned help.

“ He hit his head first,” Doheney said. “He had blood all over him. “I held his hand and put my jacket on his nose for pressure and made sure he was breathing okay.”

Hull isn’t the first bicyclist to fall victim to the speed bump.

David Ravo, a resident who lives on Chesebro Road where the accident occurred, said the speed bump has caused injuries to bicyclists before.

“I am an avid bicyclist, and I even get caught in that unguarded area under the tree,” Ravo said.

“It’s ridiculous when it’s under the shade—there’s no color to see it. It’s literally invisible.”

The speed bumps were built years ago by the homeowners, who have been responsible for their maintenance.

“Typically this occurs in unincorporated areas of counties or in homes that were built prior to the incorporation of a city,” said Nathan Hamburger, Agoura Hills’ assistant city manager, “The city has no control over anything built on that section of road.”

Ravo described the speed bump on that section of Chesebro as “thin” and abrupt. The speed bump is abrupt and can easily knock riders off their bicycles, he said.

Modern speed bumps, such as the ones on other sections of Chesebro Road, are constructed in wider, more rounded configurations, he said. And they’re safer.

These (private) speed bumps are from long ago,” Ravo said.

Hull said he hopes that the homeowners will pay for speed bump reconstruction on their

Bicycle rider Vince Hull hit a speed bump on a private road in Old Agoura and went flying.

The April 6 accident left him unconscious until a passerby found him and called paramedics. The accident, which raises questions about the effectiveness of private road maintenance in the community, happened on a section of Chesebro Road near Driver Avenue.

Hull, 56, said he sustained a concussion, four broken ribs and a “fair amount of road rash.” He was taken by helicopter to UCLA Medical Center where he spent two days before being released.

Hull said there are three speed bumps on the road, and the one that he hit is particularly treacherous. The speed bump constructed and supposedly maintained by the homeowners is obscured by either dark shade or bright sunshine.

“I knew it was there,” Hull said. “I saw the two speed bumps and approached (with caution).”

But the third bump seemed to disappear in the shadows of a large tree, he said.

Wendy Doheney of Agoura Hills found Hull passed out on the road while jogging with a friend. She stayed with Hull while her friend summoned help.

“ He hit his head first,” Doheney said. “He had blood all over him. “I held his hand and put my jacket on his nose for pressure and made sure he was breathing okay.”

Hull isn’t the first bicyclist to fall victim to the speed bump.

David Ravo, a resident who lives on Chesebro Road where the accident occurred, said the speed bump has caused injuries to bicyclists before.

“I am an avid bicyclist, and I even get caught in that unguarded area under the tree,” Ravo said.

“It’s ridiculous when it’s under the shade—there’s no color to see it. It’s literally invisible.”

The speed bumps were built years ago by the homeowners, who have been responsible for their maintenance.

“Typically this occurs in unincorporated areas of counties or in homes that were built prior to the incorporation of a city,” said Nathan Hamburger, Agoura Hills’ assistant city manager, “The city has no control over anything built on that section of road.”

Ravo described the speed bump on that section of Chesebro as “thin” and abrupt. The speed bump is abrupt and can easily knock riders off their bicycles, he said.

Modern speed bumps, such as the ones on other sections of Chesebro Road, are constructed in wider, more rounded configurations, he said. And they’re safer.

These (private) speed bumps are from long ago,” Ravo said.

Hull said he hopes that the homeowners will pay for speed bump reconstruction on their

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