2003-09-04 / Front Page

Former U.S. treasurer may run against Barbara Boxer

Acorn Staff Writer
By Heather Milo

Former U.S. treasurer may run against Barbara Boxer


LISA ADAMS/The Acorn  MEET AND GREET--Rosario Marin, left, 41st treasurer of the United States of America, is guest of honor at a meet-and-greet of the Apple Pie Foundation hosted by Beverly Thompson, far right, national and state foundation chairwoman, at her Westlake Village home. Along with Carol Brinkmann, to Marin's left, and Bicky Holquin, Marin chatted with guests on various subjects including her possible bid for election to the U.S. Senate. She would run against California's Barbara Boxer.LISA ADAMS/The Acorn MEET AND GREET--Rosario Marin, left, 41st treasurer of the United States of America, is guest of honor at a meet-and-greet of the Apple Pie Foundation hosted by Beverly Thompson, far right, national and state foundation chairwoman, at her Westlake Village home. Along with Carol Brinkmann, to Marin's left, and Bicky Holquin, Marin chatted with guests on various subjects including her possible bid for election to the U.S. Senate. She would run against California's Barbara Boxer.

By Heather Milo

Acorn Staff Writer

Former U.S. treasurer Rosario Marin tested Republican support in the Conejo Valley last weekend as she begins her bid for the U.S. Senate to challenge for the seat currently held by Democrat Barbara Boxer.

Marin was a guest of the Apple Pie Foundation, a Westlake Village Republican fundraising organization.

According to deputy finance director Jason Pitkin, Marin wants to explore her financial strength in the area before officially announcing her candidacy.

Marin recently resigned as treasurer in mid-August to set the stage for her Senate campaign.

"We want to make sure there’s no conflict of interest," Pitkin said.

Marin was sworn in as the 41st treasurer of the United States by secretary Paul O’Neill Aug. 16, 2001. The first Mexican-born U.S. treasurer , she’s also the highest Latina to serve in the Bush administration.

Prior to her work as treasurer, Marin served as mayor and city councilwoman for Huntington Park, where she currently lives. The city has 85,000 residents and a population that’s 99 percent Hispanic.

Marin also worked as deputy director of the Governor’s Office of Community Relations under former Gov. Pete Wilson. She founded an organization called "Fuerza" (or "Force" in English) to help children with disabilities, as her own son was born with Down syndrome.

She also created a support group for Latino families with children with Down syndrome.

As U.S. treasurer, part of Marin’s job was to travel the country and promote the Bush tax cut, which she believes will help create more jobs. If people have more money in their pockets they’ll spend it on products and services, which will help companies expand, she said.

Marin said that with more people working, more taxes will be paid that will offset the tax cut.

Marin called Boxer "vulnerable" right now, charging that she has voted against all job creation packages submitted by the president.

"She’s the most anti-business senator in the U.S. Senate," Marin said.

Marin also oversaw the production and protection of the nation’s currency, including the creation of the money. She also dealt with the savings bond program and issues concerning counterfeiting. The new $20 bill was issued while Marin was treasurer.

Asked why she’s running for Senate, Marin said her reasons are simple. "You are either part of the problem or part of the solution."

Marin said she’s dismayed that businesses and citizens are leaving the state at record levels, due largely to the financial challenges they face and the lack of support for commerce in general.

She acknowledged that losing large numbers of jobs creates a major problem for families.

"If you cannot plan for your future, it puts an end to your dreams," she said.

Marin graduated from California State University in Los Angeles and from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government Programs for Senior Executives in State and Local Government.

"Everything that I am, I owe to California," Marin said, and added that she wants Californians to have access to that American dream once again—to be able to start with nothing and gain financial independence through individual effort.

Westlake Village resident Beverly Thompson, who hosted the Apple Pie gathering, said she can relate to Marin’s philosophy, having built her own business from the ground up.

Thompson founded the Apple Pie Foundation four years ago when George W. Bush started running for president. Her goal with the foundation was to help young families become educated in politics and registered to vote.

Thompson’s foundation supplied opportunities such as family get-togethers, picnics and apple pie socials.

Thomas met Marin at the Santa Barbara Lincoln Club, an organization for registered republicans. She soon organized a "meet and greet" event through her foundation, so that Marin could make the trip to Westlake.

As a prominent Latina, Marin may be just what the Republicans are looking for as the campaign season heats up.

Bob Larkin, publisher for the Ventura County Lincoln Club newsletter, said that in California there are 1.3 million more women registered as Democrats than Republicans.

"It’s going to take people like Rosario…to get us out of that," Larkin said.

He pointed out that 87 percent of registered Republicans are white males, but that California only has a 25-27 percent white male population. He said the state’s Democrats are 75 percent minorities and women. Democrats also have 10 percent more registered voters, according to Larkin.

"We’re rooting for people like Rosario, to represent the minorities," he said.


Return to top